Wednesday, June 15, 2016

An Old Interview with Inge Sargent, the last Mahadevi of Hsipaw

This is an old interview with Inge Sargent (စဝ်သုစန္ဒီ), the last Mahadevi of Hsipaw (သီပေါ မဟာဒေဝီ). The movie about her life has been banned in Burma at the Human Rights Human Dignity International Film festival.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Lisu keyboard in Google Input Tools

If you use Chrome browser, Google Input Tools is a great resource if you need to type in a language not natively supported by your operating system.

Google Input Tools has recently been updated. They added Lisu (lis). Let me walk you through how you can add Chrome extension of Google Input Tools, and add Lisu keyboard (and Burmese if you like).

First, go to Google Chrome Web Store. Search for "Google Input Tools."



You will find it in the Extension section. Click on it. Near the top right corner, you will find "Add to Chrome" button. Add by clicking on it.


To add keyboards, click on the keyboard icon near the right corner of the browser's address bar as seen below. Choose the "Extension options."


You can now look for Lisu and add.


That's it. You can now type in Lisu or Burmese by choosing the right keyboard.

For Linux computer, I have written a post before.

For Windows 8 and above, the keyboard is built-in. You just need to activate it.

For Android, Multiling O Keyboard has Lisu. Newer version of Android (6.0) has Google's Noto Sans Lisu font pre-installed.

I don't know the situation on OSX and iOS.

Tuesday, April 05, 2016

Than Myint U's talk

A good talk by Than Myint U about Burma. It's half an hour long. But it's worth it. He touched on colonial days, post-independence years (especially the collapse of the weak colonial institutions after British withdrew) and the military isolation in the 60s, linking the historical events to the present and to where Burma's future is heading. One thing that caught my attention was the need for infrastructure investment between 2015 and 2030. By one estimate, he said, Burma needed 100 billions dollars to invest in electricity, roads, railways, healthcare and education.

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Spring Equinox

Since today is the first day of spring, I am posting this YouTube video explaining what spring equinox is. On the other hand, it's Fall equinox for those of you on the southern hemisphere.

Friday, March 18, 2016

A song from Manipuri film

Several months ago, I came across this song from Manipur on Facebook, shared by a friend. The girl is singing in Burmese. What I am not sure is whether she is singing in Burmese with her accent or a dialect of Burmese in that area. It might be interesting to further look into.

Thursday, March 17, 2016

How Maple syrup is made

Last weekend (on March 12, 2016), we went to Asherwood Environmental Science Center in Wabash, Indiana. One of our host parents, Neil Sowards, took us.


We had breakfast with pancakes and Maple syrup made right there.


We saw their Maple syrup evaporator. If you are curious, this YouTube video tells you how Maple syrup is made from the sap.






Here is how the sap is collected in the sugar bush.

They also made them into candies. It's similar to ထန်းလျက် [tʰəɲeʔ] (palm sugar) in Burma. Of course, palm sugar candy is made from palm tree syrup. So this is American ထန်းလျက် made from Maple syrup. :)


Here is palm sugar candy made in Burma.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

The moment in Burma

Maung Zarni's opinion at the Guardian:

"Still, Htin Kyaw’s assumption of the presidency is a symbolically important moment for the Burmese public, who have repeatedly expressed their desire to rid the country of their military overlords. For the first time in 53 years, 51 million Burmese people have got a genuine civilian president who is not a general or ex-general in civilian clothing, and who can be expected not to promote the military’s interests.

Beyond this symbolic progress, the presidential politics of proxies in the high offices of Myanmar – the military with their ex-intelligence chief and Suu Kyi with her absolutely loyal former classmate – doesn’t augur well for the future of the country. But again, genuine democracy will require a renewed, hard and sustained push by all sections of the country."